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Posts Tagged ‘Alexandre Cacareco’

Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.
The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.

The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“I gave him a brotherly hug. We hadn’t seen each other in a long time, so I didn’t let go of him. I missed him” Renzo Gracie, explaining the tactic he used to beat cousin Jean-Jacques Machado in the under 77kg final, in 2000.

“Hey, truck my sheakrra!” – Fredson Paixao, in 2001, asking, in “English”, the waitress of the hotel to give him a different coffee cup at breakfast.

“It’s about making the guy pant!” – Jose Mario Sperry, explaining to Ricardo Arona the strategy to beat Mark Kerr in the 2003 supermatch.

“I haven’t put on a gi in a long time. I don’t think there is one that will fit me” – Jeff Monson, two-time ADCC champion, in 2005, giving his version of why he does better in submission grappling.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“How are you going to go about stopping him? With a gun?” spectator impressed with the performance of Marcelo Garcia in 2007, when he submitted seven of his eight opponents.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“If I swept a 90kg guy, Marcio [Feitosa] I’ll put on my shoulder and throw” – Saulo Ribeiro, provoking his friend in 2000.

“I left my two matches on a stretcher. That’s alright, the worst part is that they filled me with injections and I scared to death of that!” – Fernando Terere revealing the drama that went on in 2003, when he disputed the 77kg division with a broken rib.

“Besides being strong, he’s so long it’s like he has one leg in the USA and the other in Brazil” – Rickson Gracie in praise of 2005’s under 99kg and absolute champion, Roger Gracie.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“I don’t like facing them. These skinny guys have legs all over the place” Alexandre Cacareco in 2007, after losing to Marcelo Garcia in the absolute.

“If he’d managed to catch me at that moment, he’d have hurt me” – Leo Vieira explaining how nervous giant Mark Kerr got after their historic match in the 2000 absolute.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“The announcer was saying my adversary was champion in karate from I don’t know where, champion in full contact from I don’t know where, etc. Truth is he didn’t even know how to bridge” – Marcio Feitosa (photo) on the (lack of) skills of his first opponent on his way to 2001’s under 77kg title.

Can you recall any other memorable phrase? Leave your comment.

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It’s hard to deny that Brazilians make up the greater part of the history of the ADCC. Brazil has by far the greatest number of titles (41*) and nearly all of the event’s legends are Brazilian.

Kerr aperta o pescoço de Zé Mário na superluta de 2001. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

Kerr asqueezes on Zé Mário's neck in the 2001 supermatch. Photo: Gustavo Aragão

However, recognition must be paid where recognition is due to the non-Brazilians who have shone in the seven installments of the ADCC. We will rank the first five and remember the achievements of each of them.
1st place – Mark Kerr – Kerr is twice champion of the over 98kg category, in 1999 and 2000. He also won the absolute in 2000. In 2001 he managed to dethrone phenomenon Jose Mario Sperry in the supermatch. Mark bid farewell to the ADCC in 2003, after losing to Ricardo Arona in the supermatch. Beyond his titles, he also played a part in the historic first match of the 2001 absolute category, when he defeated the 40kg-lighter Leo Vieira.
2nd place – Jeff Monson (USA) – In the early days he was known as Jeff Monson. He participated in the ADCC ever since 1999 (with an absence in 2007) and is signed up for this year’s installment, in the over 99kg category in 2005. Beyond that, he was under 99kg runner-up in 2000 and 2001. And, of course, no one can forget how he left the Ibirapuera gymnasium naked, in 2003, when he felt he was shortchanged by the referees after losing to Saulo Ribeiro in the absolute.
3rd place – Dean Lister (USA) – He came out of no where to replace Jon Olav Einemo’s place in the absolute of 2003 and surprised everyone by beating Pe de Pano, Saulo Ribeiro and Alexandre Cacareco to become champion. Two years later, he was in the supermatch against Jean Jacques Machado and drubbed by 8 to 0 the Brazilian, who is to this day considered one of the most technical players to ever set foot on the ADCC mat. The world awaited anxiously to watch Lister face Roger Gracie two years later in the ADCC supermatch, but the American was unable to make it.
4th place – Ricco Rodriguez (USA) – Of the seven installments, he only didn’t participate in 2003 and 2007. he was champion of the over 99kg division in 1998, beating Sean Alvarez in the final. Beyond that, he took third in the absolute in 1999 and was runner-up in the over 99kg in 2000. To close, he took part in the best match of ADCC 2005, against Marcelo Garcia, in the absolute.
5th place – Jon Olav Einemo (Norway), Mark Robinson (South Africa), Sanae Kikuta (Japan), Kareem Barchlov (Russia) – the quartet completes the list of non-Brazilians to have won the main divisions of the ADCC.
Do you agree with our list? Add your comment.
*We count supermatches too

However, recognition must be paid where recognition is due to the non-Brazilians who have shone in the seven installments of the ADCC. We will rank the first five and remember the achievements of each of them.

1st place – Mark Kerr – Kerr is twice champion of the over 98kg category, in 1999 and 2000. He also won the absolute in 2000. In 2001 he managed to dethrone phenomenon Jose Mario Sperry in the supermatch. Mark bid farewell to the ADCC in 2003, after losing to Ricardo Arona in the supermatch. Beyond his titles, he also played a part in the historic first match of the 2001 absolute category, when he defeated the 40kg-lighter Leo Vieira.

2nd place – Jeff Monson (USA) – In the early days he was known as Jeff Monson. He participated in the ADCC ever since 1999 (with an absence in 2007) and is signed up for this year’s installment, in the over 99kg category in 2005. Beyond that, he was under 99kg runner-up in 2000 and 2001. And, of course, no one can forget how he left the Ibirapuera gymnasium naked, in 2003, when he felt he was shortchanged by the referees after losing to Saulo Ribeiro in the absolute.

3rd place – Dean Lister (USA) – He came out of no where to replace Jon Olav Einemo’s place in the absolute of 2003 and surprised everyone by beating Pe de Pano, Saulo Ribeiro and Alexandre Cacareco to become champion. Two years later, he was in the supermatch against Jean Jacques Machado and drubbed by 8 to 0 the Brazilian, who is to this day considered one of the most technical players to ever set foot on the ADCC mat. The world awaited anxiously to watch Lister face Roger Gracie two years later in the ADCC supermatch, but the American was unable to make it.

4th place – Ricco Rodriguez (USA) – Of the seven installments, he only didn’t participate in 2003 and 2007. he was champion of the over 99kg division in 1998, beating Sean Alvarez in the final. Beyond that, he took third in the absolute in 1999 and was runner-up in the over 99kg in 2000. To close, he took part in the best match of ADCC 2005, against Marcelo Garcia, in the absolute.

5th place – Jon Olav Einemo (Norway), Mark Robinson (South Africa), Sanae Kikuta (Japan), Kareem Barchlov (Russia) – the quartet completes the list of non-Brazilians to have won the main divisions of the ADCC.

Do you agree with our list? Add your comment.

*We count supermatches too

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The under 66kg category of the ADCC was owned by the same guy since 1999. Without false modesty, shortly after taking his third, in 2001, Royler Gracie remarked: “Few have had the pleasure of being Jiu-Jitsu world champion four times in a row, as I have, and now three times in Abu Dhabi. This is unprecedented and unlikely to be matched,” said the Gracie after beating Hawaiian Barret Yoshida for his third.
So, when the ADCC disembarked in the Ibirapuera park, in Sao Paulo, on the 17th and 18th of May, 2003, the general expectation was that the three-time champion would at least make it to the semifinal of the under 66kg. From the way the brackets were set up, there Royler would face the rising star of Leo Vieira, then leader of Master, who would go on to win his first title in the final against Barret Yoshida.

The under 66kg category of the ADCC was owned by the same guy since 1999. Without false modesty, shortly after taking his third, in 2001, Royler Gracie remarked: “Few have had the pleasure of being Jiu-Jitsu world champion four times in a row, as I have, and now three times in Abu Dhabi. This is unprecedented and unlikely to be matched,” said the Gracie after beating Hawaiian Barret Yoshida for his third.

So, when the ADCC disembarked in the Ibirapuera park, in Sao Paulo, on the 17th and 18th of May, 2003, the general expectation was that the three-time champion would at least make it to the semifinal of the under 66kg. From the way the brackets were set up, there Royler would face the rising star of Leo Vieira, then leader of Master, who would go on to win his first title in the final against Barret Yoshida.

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But on the path there was an underdog from California. Who had heard of Eddie Bravo? The American trials winner was losing the match when he managed to replace guard and sink a triangle on the distracted Gracie (photo above): “I don’t know how to explain it. It was really quick, as though I’d disconnected from the match for three seconds. When I came to, I was in a triangle,” Royler tried to explain after having tapped out for the first time in his weight category, with or without the gi. In the follow up, Leo didn’t give Bravo a chance in the semifinal.

Royler still went on to fight again and with an 8 to 0 score over Alexandre “Soca” Carneiro secured third place and his fourth time on the winners’ stand in a row for the Gracie Humaita leader. Eddie Bravo didn’t compete for third, alleging injury, and never again appeared in the ADCC.

The ADCC has seen other underdogs, not quite as unlikely, but underdogs nevertheless.

That very event, in the under 99kg category, Norwegian Jon Olav Einemo is to this day responsible for Roger Gracie’s lone loss in the ADCC (photo below). Then 21 years old, the current two-time absolute world champion was sincere in explaining his defeat: “Truth is, I underestimated the guy. I went in slow, to let him exert force and push the pace, but, when I realized what was going on, he was on my back.

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Going back in time, in 1999, in Abu Dhabi, the underdog had his way in the under 88kg of the second installment of the ADCC. In the division considered the most evenly matched, a pair of Russians managed to made it through to the final in the presence of Renzo Gracie, Ricardo Libório, Fábio Gurgel and Amaury Bitetti. Kareem Barchlov (in the photo below throwing Liborio) and Alexander Savko decided the title, with Kareem, who curiously had Savko in his corner throughout the competition, taking gold.

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In another leap in time, we arrive at 2007, when the ADCC touched down in New Jersey. Last event, it was Saulo Ribeiro who was surprised by an underdog (photo below on the right). Right in his second match in the under 77kg category, the two-time champion (2000 and 2003) was submitted by Mike Fowler, who earlier beat Renzo Gracie (photo below on left), another two-time champion (1998 and 2000). The Lloyd Irvin student, famous for his leopard spotted hair, took fourth after losing to Marcelo Garcia and Andre Galvao, in the third-place decider.

ADCC2007NJ0138 ADCC2007NJ0315

Rounding out the list of underdogs, we return to 2003. In Ibirapuera Park, only the absolute dispute remains. Signed up are Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Saulo Ribeiro, Marcelo Garcia (who had just run rampant in the under 77kg) and Jeff Monson, just to name the most famous. A little while on, we are at the final and untrue to expectations, the finalists are Alexandre Cacareco and Dean Lister, with the latter a true underdog. Firstly, Lister wasn’t even going to participate and only entered because Jon Olav dropped out. On his way to the final, the American went past Nathan Marquardt and ran into Saulo Ribeiro (photo below). Lister ended up beating the two-time champion with a kneebar in overtime.

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The opponent in the semifinal was over-99kg champion Pe de Pano, a firm favorite. Lister held out against a choke from his back for five minutes to win in overtime. On Pe de Pano’s choke hold, Dean was nonchalant: “I’ve spent over 100 hours in triangles.” In the final, a quick ankle lock on Cacareco guaranteed him first place..

Can you think of any other ADCC underdogs? If so, please comment.

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