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Four days from the star of the 2009 event in Barcelona, the GRACIEMAG.com ADCC 2009 Blog offers up a ranking of the athletes in the tournament’s overall history. In putting it together, we lay out all the results since the first installment of the competition and attribute points according to the importance of each position on the winners’ stand (you will find the points listed below.

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With his win over Ze Mario in 2001, Kerr leads the Ranking, whereas the "Zen Machine" is runner-up even without competing since 2003. Photo: Luca Atalla

According to the criteria adopted for the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking, 67 athletes scored points and guaranteed their places on the list.
For the time being, we release only the male rankings, but the female one is on the way.
The following points criteria was applied:
1.Absolute champion – 20pts
2.Weight category champion – 17pts
3.Supermatch winner – 15pts
4.Absolute runner-up – 13pts
5.Weight category runner-up – 11pts
6.Supermatch runner-up – 9pts
7.Absolute third place – 7pts
8.Weight category third place – 5pts
9.Most technical athlete – 3pts
10.Best match participant – 2pts
In the event of an even number of points, the athlete with wins of greater significance takes the lead. For example, even with the same number of wins, the athlete with an absolute title will be ranked ahead of the athlete who won a weight division.
Check out the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking

According to the criteria adopted for the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking, 67 athletes scored points and guaranteed their places on the list.

For the time being, we release only the male rankings, but the female one is on the way.

The following points criteria was applied:

1.Absolute champion – 20pts

2.Weight category champion – 17pts

3.Supermatch winner – 15pts

4.Absolute runner-up – 13pts

5.Weight category runner-up – 11pts

6.Supermatch runner-up – 9pts

7.Absolute third place – 7pts

8.Weight category third place – 5pts

9.Most technical athlete – 3pts

10.Best match participant – 2pts

In the event of an even number of points, the athlete with wins of greater significance takes the lead. For example, even with the same number of wins, the athlete with an absolute title will be ranked ahead of the athlete who won a weight division.

Check out the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking

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What do you think of the ranking? Leave your comment.

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Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.
The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.

The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“I gave him a brotherly hug. We hadn’t seen each other in a long time, so I didn’t let go of him. I missed him” Renzo Gracie, explaining the tactic he used to beat cousin Jean-Jacques Machado in the under 77kg final, in 2000.

“Hey, truck my sheakrra!” – Fredson Paixao, in 2001, asking, in “English”, the waitress of the hotel to give him a different coffee cup at breakfast.

“It’s about making the guy pant!” – Jose Mario Sperry, explaining to Ricardo Arona the strategy to beat Mark Kerr in the 2003 supermatch.

“I haven’t put on a gi in a long time. I don’t think there is one that will fit me” – Jeff Monson, two-time ADCC champion, in 2005, giving his version of why he does better in submission grappling.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“How are you going to go about stopping him? With a gun?” spectator impressed with the performance of Marcelo Garcia in 2007, when he submitted seven of his eight opponents.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“If I swept a 90kg guy, Marcio [Feitosa] I’ll put on my shoulder and throw” – Saulo Ribeiro, provoking his friend in 2000.

“I left my two matches on a stretcher. That’s alright, the worst part is that they filled me with injections and I scared to death of that!” – Fernando Terere revealing the drama that went on in 2003, when he disputed the 77kg division with a broken rib.

“Besides being strong, he’s so long it’s like he has one leg in the USA and the other in Brazil” – Rickson Gracie in praise of 2005’s under 99kg and absolute champion, Roger Gracie.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“I don’t like facing them. These skinny guys have legs all over the place” Alexandre Cacareco in 2007, after losing to Marcelo Garcia in the absolute.

“If he’d managed to catch me at that moment, he’d have hurt me” – Leo Vieira explaining how nervous giant Mark Kerr got after their historic match in the 2000 absolute.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“The announcer was saying my adversary was champion in karate from I don’t know where, champion in full contact from I don’t know where, etc. Truth is he didn’t even know how to bridge” – Marcio Feitosa (photo) on the (lack of) skills of his first opponent on his way to 2001’s under 77kg title.

Can you recall any other memorable phrase? Leave your comment.

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It’s hard to deny that Brazilians make up the greater part of the history of the ADCC. Brazil has by far the greatest number of titles (41*) and nearly all of the event’s legends are Brazilian.

Kerr aperta o pescoço de Zé Mário na superluta de 2001. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

Kerr asqueezes on Zé Mário's neck in the 2001 supermatch. Photo: Gustavo Aragão

However, recognition must be paid where recognition is due to the non-Brazilians who have shone in the seven installments of the ADCC. We will rank the first five and remember the achievements of each of them.
1st place – Mark Kerr – Kerr is twice champion of the over 98kg category, in 1999 and 2000. He also won the absolute in 2000. In 2001 he managed to dethrone phenomenon Jose Mario Sperry in the supermatch. Mark bid farewell to the ADCC in 2003, after losing to Ricardo Arona in the supermatch. Beyond his titles, he also played a part in the historic first match of the 2001 absolute category, when he defeated the 40kg-lighter Leo Vieira.
2nd place – Jeff Monson (USA) – In the early days he was known as Jeff Monson. He participated in the ADCC ever since 1999 (with an absence in 2007) and is signed up for this year’s installment, in the over 99kg category in 2005. Beyond that, he was under 99kg runner-up in 2000 and 2001. And, of course, no one can forget how he left the Ibirapuera gymnasium naked, in 2003, when he felt he was shortchanged by the referees after losing to Saulo Ribeiro in the absolute.
3rd place – Dean Lister (USA) – He came out of no where to replace Jon Olav Einemo’s place in the absolute of 2003 and surprised everyone by beating Pe de Pano, Saulo Ribeiro and Alexandre Cacareco to become champion. Two years later, he was in the supermatch against Jean Jacques Machado and drubbed by 8 to 0 the Brazilian, who is to this day considered one of the most technical players to ever set foot on the ADCC mat. The world awaited anxiously to watch Lister face Roger Gracie two years later in the ADCC supermatch, but the American was unable to make it.
4th place – Ricco Rodriguez (USA) – Of the seven installments, he only didn’t participate in 2003 and 2007. he was champion of the over 99kg division in 1998, beating Sean Alvarez in the final. Beyond that, he took third in the absolute in 1999 and was runner-up in the over 99kg in 2000. To close, he took part in the best match of ADCC 2005, against Marcelo Garcia, in the absolute.
5th place – Jon Olav Einemo (Norway), Mark Robinson (South Africa), Sanae Kikuta (Japan), Kareem Barchlov (Russia) – the quartet completes the list of non-Brazilians to have won the main divisions of the ADCC.
Do you agree with our list? Add your comment.
*We count supermatches too

However, recognition must be paid where recognition is due to the non-Brazilians who have shone in the seven installments of the ADCC. We will rank the first five and remember the achievements of each of them.

1st place – Mark Kerr – Kerr is twice champion of the over 98kg category, in 1999 and 2000. He also won the absolute in 2000. In 2001 he managed to dethrone phenomenon Jose Mario Sperry in the supermatch. Mark bid farewell to the ADCC in 2003, after losing to Ricardo Arona in the supermatch. Beyond his titles, he also played a part in the historic first match of the 2001 absolute category, when he defeated the 40kg-lighter Leo Vieira.

2nd place – Jeff Monson (USA) – In the early days he was known as Jeff Monson. He participated in the ADCC ever since 1999 (with an absence in 2007) and is signed up for this year’s installment, in the over 99kg category in 2005. Beyond that, he was under 99kg runner-up in 2000 and 2001. And, of course, no one can forget how he left the Ibirapuera gymnasium naked, in 2003, when he felt he was shortchanged by the referees after losing to Saulo Ribeiro in the absolute.

3rd place – Dean Lister (USA) – He came out of no where to replace Jon Olav Einemo’s place in the absolute of 2003 and surprised everyone by beating Pe de Pano, Saulo Ribeiro and Alexandre Cacareco to become champion. Two years later, he was in the supermatch against Jean Jacques Machado and drubbed by 8 to 0 the Brazilian, who is to this day considered one of the most technical players to ever set foot on the ADCC mat. The world awaited anxiously to watch Lister face Roger Gracie two years later in the ADCC supermatch, but the American was unable to make it.

4th place – Ricco Rodriguez (USA) – Of the seven installments, he only didn’t participate in 2003 and 2007. he was champion of the over 99kg division in 1998, beating Sean Alvarez in the final. Beyond that, he took third in the absolute in 1999 and was runner-up in the over 99kg in 2000. To close, he took part in the best match of ADCC 2005, against Marcelo Garcia, in the absolute.

5th place – Jon Olav Einemo (Norway), Mark Robinson (South Africa), Sanae Kikuta (Japan), Kareem Barchlov (Russia) – the quartet completes the list of non-Brazilians to have won the main divisions of the ADCC.

Do you agree with our list? Add your comment.

*We count supermatches too

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It is September 12. There are 14 days to go till ADCC 2009. In Rio de Janeiro, Leonardo Vieira is at the Brazilian Team Nationals leading Checkmat, the team he put together two years ago with brother Ricardo, when both left Brasa.
The two-time under 66kg champion spent the last week training in Rio de Janeiro, but returns to Sao Paulo for the final week of training before the trip. In between his students’ disputes, Leo had the following chat with GRACIEMAG.com ADCC 2009 blog.

It is September 12. There are 14 days to go till ADCC 2009. In Rio de Janeiro, Leonardo Vieira is at the Brazilian Team Nationals leading Checkmat, the team he put together two years ago with brother Ricardo, when both left Brasa.

The two-time under 66kg champion spent the last week training in Rio de Janeiro, but returns to Sao Paulo for the final week of training before the trip. In between his students’ disputes, Leo had the following chat with GRACIEMAG.com ADCC 2009 blog.

Blog: How has your preparation for the ADCC 2009 been going?
Leo Vieira: I’m training with my students in Sao Paulo and spent this week in Rio, training with my brother. Today I turn 33, my time is divided between my kids, leading the team and training, but I have a phenomenal team that supports me all the way.

Blog: Your toughest adversaries in the category have been competing all the time while you haven’t competed since 2007. Do you feel that will hinder you?
Leo: I’m an athlete and I manage to compete well even if I’m not coming off a series of competitions. I’ve been through that before.

Leozinho em ação em 2007. Foto: Luca Atalla

Leo in action in 2007. Photo: Luca Atalla

Blog: Still on the topic of your opponents, the under 66kg category unites such names as Rani Yahya, Cobrinha, Rafael Mendes, among others. Have you been practicing specific strategies for each of them?
Leo: My strategy against all adversaries is to feel comfortable in the match. I see each adversary as being 15 opportunities for defeat. I think the category will be just as tough as the other ones.

Blog: In 2007 you lost in the final to Rani Yahya, after having beat him in 2005. Will this year be the tie-breaker?
Leo: My loss to Rani caused me to reassess my reasons for competing. In 2007, I was lagging in the ADCC. I lagged in my first matches, won, but when I made it to the final I couldn’t manage to win. The problem was all about motivation. When I started Jiu-Jitsu, my motivation was to move up in belts to get to black. When I made it there, my motivation was to become world champion, which I managed to do too. When I made it to ADCC 2007 I couldn’t see any motivation for being there. That’s why I ate wrong, trained wrong and fought wrong. The loss made me see how I didn’t have to fight just for me, but for my team, for those who follow me, to leave a legacy.

O duelo com Rani. Foto: Guilherme Rafols

The match with Rani. Photo: Guilherme Rafols

Blog: Looking back, what was your greatest moment in the ADCC? The one you hold dearest to you?
Leo: A lot of folks only think of wins, but to me my greatest moment was my match with Mark Kerr, in 2000. I like to talk about that match, if just to remind people how it went. A lot of people think it was a supermatch, or the final of the absolute. Truth is, it was the first match of the absolute that year. To me, that match marked the way I fight. I lost, but only by a penalty point, because they said I backed away.

Blog: You’ve been disputing the ADCC since 2000. Who was the athlete to impress you most all these years?
Leo: The one to most impress me was Marcelo Garcia. He left the tryouts he lost in 2003 to submit everyone and maintain the title to this day.

What about you? Do you feel Leo can take a third ADCC title? Leave your comment.

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Do you know that Minotauro competed at the ADCC? What about Tito Ortiz, Vitor Belfort or Matt Hughes? Do you remember?

Ever since 1998, the ADCC and its big-money prizes have drawn in a slew of different grappling styles styles, nationalities from the world over and athletes representing all the world’s major fighting events.

Some names have become synonymous with the competition, like Renzo (seven appearances), Saulo Ribeiro, Leo Vieira (six) and Ze Mario Sperry.

Many, though, participated in one or two editions and went on to shine in other fields, MMA for instance. We drew from memory a list of these characters who in but one chapter of the extensive soap opera of the ADCC. If you feel some of the champions are missing, don’t worry, they will have a post all to themselves.

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Rodrigo Gracie – He won the under 88kg category in 1998. The next year, a knee injury kept him from defending his title. He returned in 2000 and took fourth in the under 77kg division.

Robin Gracie – The current leader of Gracie Barcelona did just fine in 1998, when he took silver in the under 66kg category. He returned in 1999, in the under 77kg, and fell out in the quarterfinals.

Rodrigo Medeiros – The black belt Carlson Gracie disciple made his appearance in 1998, in the under 77kg category. He lost to Renzo Gracie in the quarterfinals.

Carlos Newton – The Canadian Ronin, who after shining in Pride, competed in 1998, in the under 88kg category. He lost in his second match to eventual champion Rodrigo Gracie.

Oleg Taktarov – A star for the early days of the UFC, the Russian showed up in the ADCC in 1998. He started out well, but dropped out in the under 99kg category semifinal, when he was squashed by American Beau Hershberger. In the absolute, he lost in his first against Ze Mario.

Ahmed Farag – The Egyptian maintains to this day the distinction of being the only Middle Easterner to make it to the winners’ stand in the ADCC. Third place in the under 88kg division in 1998 guaranteed him the honor.

Vinicius “Draculino” Magalhaes – The Brazilian black belt who now teaches in Texas tried his luck in 1999. He fell out in his second match in the under 66kg category, against training partner Alexandre “Soca” Carneiro, who would go on to be runner-up.

Andre Pederneiras – The leader of Nova Uniao competed in the under 77kg category, in 1999. He lost his first match, for taking a throw from Hayato Sakurai, who went on to take bronze.

Fabio Gurgel – The general of Alliance didn’t have much luck in the ADCC. In his first match in the under 88kg category, in 1999, he put Nobuhiro Tsurmaki to sleep, but in his second he lost by a throw to Russian runner-up Alexander Savko.

Luis Orlando – 1998’s under 77kg silver medalist Luiz Orlando returned in 1999, when he fell out in his second match to teammate Ricardo Liborio. He did compete in the absolute, but was overcome in his first match.

Joao Roque – Along with Royler Gracie, he earned the title of best match of ADCC 1999. He lost, but made history.

Murilo Bustamante – The leader of the BTT tried his luck in the ADCC in 1999 and 2000. He had three matches in the under 99kg category. He was eliminated by Saulo Ribeiro in a riveting match. In the absolute, he lost to Ricco Rodriguez in the quarterfinals. One year later, Murilo was overcome by Mike Van Arsdale after 15 minutes of combat.

Carlao Barreto – Yet another Carlson Gracie student to appear in the ADCC, Carlao came up against the boogeyman in Mark Kerr in the over 99kg category in 1999, and dropped out of the running. One year later the one to beat him was Ricco Rodriguez, who in a controversial match overcame the Brazilian.

Wellington Dias – Megaton only had one match in the ADCC. IN 1999, he faced Hawaiian Barret Yoshida right of the bat and tapped to a flying armbar.

Alexandre “Pequeno” Nogueira – The “King of Shooto” appeared in the ADCC in 2000, in the under 66kg category. After winning his first, he lost in the semifinal to Joel Gilbert.

Marcio “Cromado” Barbosa – the leader of RFT team had but one bout at ADCC 2000 and was unlucky to come up against under 77kg runner-up Jean Jacques Machado, who finished him.

Roberto “Roleta” Magalhaes – The inventor of weird-jitsu had two matches in the under 88kg category in 2000. In the second, he faced runner-up Ricardo Liborio and was only defeated in overtime. He returned for the absolute and lost to Comprido in the opening stage.

Jorge “Macaco” Patino – Macaco, who now teaches in New Jersey, reached the semifinal of the under 88kg category, losing dramatically to Ricardo Liborio, after fracturing his arm.

Antonio Schembri – Elvis had two appearances in the ADCC. In 2000, he lost right away to Kareem Berchlov, in a match considered one of the best of the event. Afterwards, in the absolute he also dropped out in his first against Mike Van Arsdale. One year on, Nino made his mark. After submitting Akehiro Gono, he ran rampant over 1999 and 2000’s finalist Alexandre Savko and caught the Belarusian’s arm within seconds, earning the admiration of the gymnasium. In the semifinal, he succumbed to Saulo Ribeiro, but he had already left his mark.

Matt Hughes – The wrestler who would go on to become one of the greatest idols of the UFC appeared in the under 99kg category at ADCC 2000. He overcame Ricardo Cachorrao, but stopped at his compatriot Jeff Monson.

Tito Ortiz – The “Bad Boy from Huntington Beach” put in a great showing in the under 99kg category in 200. He made it to the semifinal losing only to Ricardo Arona, but securing bronze.

Rodrigo Medeiros – Comprido competed at the ADCC 2000 and lost in his second to Jeff Monson, in the over 99kg category. In the absolute, the same deal but eliminated by Tito Ortiz after beating Roleta.

Josh Barnett – The UFC and Pride star showed up at the ADCC in 2000, in the over 99kg category. Unlucky, he came up against his compatriot Mark Kerr right off the bat. In the absolute, another loss in his first match, this time to Ricardo Cachorrao.

Antonio Rodrigo “Minotauro” Nogueira – The most popular athlete in the Brazilian MMA scene went out on a limb at ADCC 2000. Mino was submitted by Ricco Rodriguez by kneebar.

Robson Moura – Robson secured bronze in the under 66kg category at ADCC 2001. He dropped out in the semifinal to three-time champion Royler Gracie, but overcame Alexandre Soca in the bronze-medal dispute.

Fredson Paixao – Another Brazilian to compete in 2001 in the under 66kg category. Paixao, though, was unlucky and fell out in the opening stage against Joey Gilbert.

Matt Serra – The Renzo Gracie student took silver in the under 77kg div in 2001. To make it there he went past Takanori Gomi, Jean Jacques Machado and Leonardo Santos. He was only stopped by Marcio Feitosa.

Takanori Gomi – As aforementioned, the Japanese MMA star had one match at ADCC 2001, losing to Matt Serra.

Vitor Belfort – Vitor ventured into the over 99kg category at ADCC 2001. He had a good debut and a takedown secured a win over Hikori Fakuda. In the next match, though, Belfort was overcome by South African Mark Robinson.

Leonardo Castello Branco – One of the leaders of Brasa, he appeared in the ADCC in 2001. In the heaviest category, Leo lost to Sean Alvarez.

Eddie Bravo – in 2003, Bravo shocked the world of submitting three-time champion Royler Gracie. And stopped there.

Fernando Terere – The star from the Cantagalo favela had two matches in the under 77kg category at ADCC 2003. In his first he defeated Jussi Tammelin, but later lost to Otto Olsen.

Ryan Gracie – the late Ryan, always controversial, had an unforgettable match against under 88kg runner-up Ronaldo Jacare, in 2003.

Matt Lindland – the American was Jacare’s second victim in the under 88kg category of 2003.

Nathan Marquardt – Now at the top of the UFC’s middleweight division after drubbing Demian Maia, he wasn’t quite so successful in 2003 and lost in his first to Comprido in the under 88kg category.

Fernando Pontes – Margarida made it to the second stage of the under 88kg category in 2003, to be eliminated by David Terrel.

Eduardo Telles – The leader of Nine Nine did fine in 2005’s under 99kg division. He submitted Antoine Jaoude with a slick straight kneebar, but left his arm in the hands of Roger Gracie.

Daniel Gracie – Took fourth in the under 99kg category in 2005.

Luiz Theodoro – Big Mac fell out in the opening stage of 2007’s absolute. In the over 99kg category he made it up to the second stage.

Did we forget anyone? Please feel free to comment.

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