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Posts Tagged ‘Renzo Gracie’

Four days from the star of the 2009 event in Barcelona, the GRACIEMAG.com ADCC 2009 Blog offers up a ranking of the athletes in the tournament’s overall history. In putting it together, we lay out all the results since the first installment of the competition and attribute points according to the importance of each position on the winners’ stand (you will find the points listed below.

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With his win over Ze Mario in 2001, Kerr leads the Ranking, whereas the "Zen Machine" is runner-up even without competing since 2003. Photo: Luca Atalla

According to the criteria adopted for the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking, 67 athletes scored points and guaranteed their places on the list.
For the time being, we release only the male rankings, but the female one is on the way.
The following points criteria was applied:
1.Absolute champion – 20pts
2.Weight category champion – 17pts
3.Supermatch winner – 15pts
4.Absolute runner-up – 13pts
5.Weight category runner-up – 11pts
6.Supermatch runner-up – 9pts
7.Absolute third place – 7pts
8.Weight category third place – 5pts
9.Most technical athlete – 3pts
10.Best match participant – 2pts
In the event of an even number of points, the athlete with wins of greater significance takes the lead. For example, even with the same number of wins, the athlete with an absolute title will be ranked ahead of the athlete who won a weight division.
Check out the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking

According to the criteria adopted for the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking, 67 athletes scored points and guaranteed their places on the list.

For the time being, we release only the male rankings, but the female one is on the way.

The following points criteria was applied:

1.Absolute champion – 20pts

2.Weight category champion – 17pts

3.Supermatch winner – 15pts

4.Absolute runner-up – 13pts

5.Weight category runner-up – 11pts

6.Supermatch runner-up – 9pts

7.Absolute third place – 7pts

8.Weight category third place – 5pts

9.Most technical athlete – 3pts

10.Best match participant – 2pts

In the event of an even number of points, the athlete with wins of greater significance takes the lead. For example, even with the same number of wins, the athlete with an absolute title will be ranked ahead of the athlete who won a weight division.

Check out the GRACIEMAG ADCC Athletes Ranking

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What do you think of the ranking? Leave your comment.

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Nine days from the start of the competition in Barcelona, nearly all the categories are filled. At the moment, only the under-99kg division awaits its last three names.
The list of stars to shine in Spain is immense, with beasts like Robert Drysdale and Ronaldo Jacare; Saulo Ribeiro and Jeff Monson; Alexandre Ribeiro and Márcio Pé de Pano; Tarsis Humphreys, André Galvão and Bráulio Estima; Marcelo Garcia and Kron Gracie; Léo Vieira, Cobrinha and Rani Yahya all set for action.

Nine days from the start of the competition in Barcelona, nearly all the categories are filled. At the moment, only the under-99kg division awaits its last three names.

The list of stars to shine in Spain is immense, with beasts like Robert Drysdale and Ronaldo Jacare; Saulo Ribeiro and Jeff Monson; Alexandre Ribeiro and Márcio Pé de Pano; Tarsis Humphreys, André Galvão and Braulio Estima; Marcelo Garcia and Kron Gracie; Leo Vieira, Cobrinha and Rani Yahya all set for action.

Supermatch

Foto: Ivan Trindade

Roger Graciesurely the greatest absence of the event.

Over 99kg

Foto: Ivan Trindade

Gabriel Vella – 2009’s ultraheavweight world champion.

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Antonio Braga Neto – 2008’s super heavyweight world champion
Leonardo Leite – Ultra heavyweight runner up in 2008.

Under 99kg

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Alexandre de Souza – world heavyweight world runner-up in 2009, European absolute champion of Jiu-Jitsu in 2008.
Roberto “Tussa” Alencar – world runner-up in 2007, third place at 2008 Worlds.

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Alexandre Cacareco – heavy presence in last ADCCs, just missed several times, including in absolute.

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Ricardo Arona – another one synonymous with the ADCC was confirmed and then canceled.

Under 88kg

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Romulo Barral – two-time medium heavyweight world champion 2007/2009. World absolute runner-up in 2007/2009.
Demian Maia – champion in 2007, his UFC obligations keep him from Barcelona.

Rousimar “Toquinho” Palhares – a fracture kept the BTT star from Barcelona.

Under 77kg

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Sergio Moraes – middleweight world champion in 2008, middleweight world runner-up in 2009.

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Renzo Gracie – ADCC legend who, should he participate in 2009, would be the only athlete in every edition of the event.

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Lucas Leite – 2007’s middleweight world champion, 2009’s Pan-American world champion, third place at middleweight at 2009 Worlds.
Michael Langhi – Lightweight world champion in 2009
Celsinho Venicius – Lightweight world champion in 2008
Lucas Lepri – Lightweight world champion in 2007
Mike Fowler – Big surprise of 2007, beating Renzo and submitting Saulo.

Under 66kg

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Royler Gracie –Three-time ADCC champion who dropped out in 2003, but who is missed to this day. Who could say Royler wouldn’t do well in Barcelona?

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Mario Reis – runner-up in 2007, third in 2008 and 2009 at featherweight.
Bruno Frazatto – third in 2007, runner-up in 2008 and 2009 at featherweight.
Robson Moura – light featherweight world champion in 2007.
Bruno Malfacine – two-time roosterweight champion in 2007 and 2009.

Female

Under 60kg
Juliana Borges – under 60kg and absolute ADCC champion 2005
Leticia Ribeiro – featherweight world champion in 2009, third in 2007 and 2009.
Michelle Nicolini – featherweight world champion in 2007, runner-up in 2009.

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Bianca Barreto – two-time featherweight world champion in 2008, 2009.
Leka Vieira – under 60kg runner-up in 2005.

Over 60kg

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Ana Laura Cordeiro – medium heavyweight world champion in 2008.
Gabrielle Garcia – heavyweight world champion in 2008.

Did we forget anyone? Leave your comment.

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Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz’s story in the ADCC can be divided into trips to heaven and those to hell. Ever since his first time in the event in 2001, the two-time absolute world champion of Jiu-Jitsu (2002, 2003) alternated between good and bad moments.
He was over-99kg champion in 2003, in Brazil, without a single point scored against him (as he promised at the press conference beforehand). He later fought with the cheering section that sided with Fabricio Werdum over a controversial point awarded by the arbiter. “I’m the best in the world and that’s that,” he yelled into the stands.

Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz’s story in the ADCC can be divided into trips to heaven and those to hell. Ever since his first time in the event in 2001, the two-time absolute world champion of Jiu-Jitsu (2002, 2003) alternated between good and bad moments.

He was over-99kg champion in 2003, in Brazil, without a single point scored against him (as he promised at the press conference beforehand). He later fought with the cheering section that sided with Fabricio Werdum over a controversial point awarded by the arbiter. “I’m the best in the world and that’s that,” he yelled into the stands.

Céu: nas costas de Marcelinho em 2003. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

Céu: nas costas de Marcelinho em 2003. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

His statement came back to bite him soon thereafter when, in the absolute semifinal, Pe lost in the final seconds to Dean Lister. After that, he didn’t even make it onto the winners’ stand after losing to the very Werdum.

Two years later, in Abu Dhabi, Pe de Pano started off in style. In the third-place match, he submitted Ricco Rodriguez with a triangle to be remembered.

Besides the slick move, it was in this match that Pe participated in one of the most memorable dialogues in the history of the event. Halfway through the 15-minute extra time in the match, Cruz looked to his corner and asked Renzo Gracie: “If I piddle around here, will I win?” “You’ll win!” replied the other nut.

Inferno: perdendo o bronze para Werdum, em 2003. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

Inferno: perdendo o bronze para Werdum, em 2003. Foto: Gustavo Aragão

In 2005 and 2007, Pe de Pano recognizes he was much to blame. For that very reason his determination to be champion in 2009 is greater than ever. Direct from the United States, where he is ending his preparations, Pe de Pano spoke with the GRACIEMAG at ADCC 2009 Blog.

Blog: The last time you competed in Jiu-Jitsu was in January, at the European Championship, and then had two MMA fights. How are you feeling, going into the ADCC?
Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz: I’m well prepared, have my head in the right place and a lot of desire to be champion. I had my last MMA fight at the end of August and I stayed here in Florida, where I’m finishing up my training with friends.

Blog: In Jiu-Jitsu you are best known for your deadly guard, but in the ADCC pulling guard means dropping points. Will that hinder or change your game in any way?
Pe de Pano: After I started practicing MMA, I noticed you can’t play guard the whole time, so these days I have a more well-rounded game for the ADCC. I take down better, have a tighter game on top, defend takedowns well and still have the old guard.

Blog: Your big moment in the ADCC was in 2003, when you won the over 99kg division and took fourth in the Absolute. Do you miss that year?
Pe de Pano: Truth is, I don’t miss 2003. I think I could have won the absolute and lost on a trifle.

Campeão em 2003. Foto: Lia Caldas

Champion in 2003. Photo: Lia Caldas

Blog: In 2005 and 2007 things didn’t go the way you’d hoped. What happened?
Pe de Pano: Those two years I had problems training, which didn’t happen this time. I’m well trained and really confident.

Blog: Why did you decide to compete at under 99kg? Won’t you have to lose a lot of weight?
Pe de Pano: Truth be told, no. My last MMA fight was under 100kg and now I intend to fight at under 93kg. In the ADCC I think the under 99kg is more competitive. Beyond that, I want to be champion of a different category from the one I won in 2003.

Blog: O Xande Ribeiro é o cara a ser batido no seu peso? Pé de Pano: Quando entro num campeonato, não penso em um nome apenas, mas com certeza ele tem que ser respeitado por ser o atual campeão e por sua história no esporte.

Injury and tears in 2005. Photo: Guilherme Rafols

Blog: Is Xande Ribeiro the man to beat at that weight?
Pe de Pano: When I go into a championship I don’t just think of one name, but he surely needs to be respected for being the current champion and for his past in the sport.

Blog: What’s a better sensation, to win the absolute in the Jiu-Jitsu world championship or to be champion of the ADCC, which pays thousands of dollars in prize money?
Pe de Pano: The Worlds is harder because it’s an open championship, while the ADCC leaves out a lot of good guys. Beyond that, the absolute at the Worlds has a little something else. It’s surely more pleasurable to win the Worlds.

Foto: Gustavo Aragão

Photo: Gustavo Aragão

Blog: What was your greatest moment in the ADCC? Is there asubmission or move you did that stands out in your mind to this day?
Pe de Pano: There were a lot of moments, but I remember most the third place I took in 2001, in the over 99kg category. In the bronze-medal dispute I sunk a sweet triangle on Ricco Rodriguez (photo above).

Blog: To finish, of the athletes you’ve seen compete, who do you consider the best in ADCC history?
Pe de Pano: Of those I’ve seen, Roger Gracie and Marcelo Garcia.

What about you, do you feel Pe de Pano is one of the favorites to take the under 99kg title? Leave your comment.

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Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.
The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Spot-on chokes, clinical armbars, sure-fire guards, acrobatic takedowns and sharp tongues. Beyond their infallible holds, the monsters of the ADCC filled the seven installments of the event with timeless phrases. Among the most inspired are Renzo Gracie, Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Nino Schembri and Saulo Ribeiro.

The seven issues GRACIEMAG dedicated to the ADCC gathered each of these magisterial tirades from the aces of the grappling art. In a variety of different languages, our reporters registered these phrases and the Blog brings back the best of them.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“I gave him a brotherly hug. We hadn’t seen each other in a long time, so I didn’t let go of him. I missed him” Renzo Gracie, explaining the tactic he used to beat cousin Jean-Jacques Machado in the under 77kg final, in 2000.

“Hey, truck my sheakrra!” – Fredson Paixao, in 2001, asking, in “English”, the waitress of the hotel to give him a different coffee cup at breakfast.

“It’s about making the guy pant!” – Jose Mario Sperry, explaining to Ricardo Arona the strategy to beat Mark Kerr in the 2003 supermatch.

“I haven’t put on a gi in a long time. I don’t think there is one that will fit me” – Jeff Monson, two-time ADCC champion, in 2005, giving his version of why he does better in submission grappling.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“How are you going to go about stopping him? With a gun?” spectator impressed with the performance of Marcelo Garcia in 2007, when he submitted seven of his eight opponents.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“If I swept a 90kg guy, Marcio [Feitosa] I’ll put on my shoulder and throw” – Saulo Ribeiro, provoking his friend in 2000.

“I left my two matches on a stretcher. That’s alright, the worst part is that they filled me with injections and I scared to death of that!” – Fernando Terere revealing the drama that went on in 2003, when he disputed the 77kg division with a broken rib.

“Besides being strong, he’s so long it’s like he has one leg in the USA and the other in Brazil” – Rickson Gracie in praise of 2005’s under 99kg and absolute champion, Roger Gracie.

Foto: Guilherme Rafols

Photo: Guilherme Rafols

“I don’t like facing them. These skinny guys have legs all over the place” Alexandre Cacareco in 2007, after losing to Marcelo Garcia in the absolute.

“If he’d managed to catch me at that moment, he’d have hurt me” – Leo Vieira explaining how nervous giant Mark Kerr got after their historic match in the 2000 absolute.

Foto: Luca Atalla

Photo: Luca Atalla

“The announcer was saying my adversary was champion in karate from I don’t know where, champion in full contact from I don’t know where, etc. Truth is he didn’t even know how to bridge” – Marcio Feitosa (photo) on the (lack of) skills of his first opponent on his way to 2001’s under 77kg title.

Can you recall any other memorable phrase? Leave your comment.

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The under 66kg category of the ADCC was owned by the same guy since 1999. Without false modesty, shortly after taking his third, in 2001, Royler Gracie remarked: “Few have had the pleasure of being Jiu-Jitsu world champion four times in a row, as I have, and now three times in Abu Dhabi. This is unprecedented and unlikely to be matched,” said the Gracie after beating Hawaiian Barret Yoshida for his third.
So, when the ADCC disembarked in the Ibirapuera park, in Sao Paulo, on the 17th and 18th of May, 2003, the general expectation was that the three-time champion would at least make it to the semifinal of the under 66kg. From the way the brackets were set up, there Royler would face the rising star of Leo Vieira, then leader of Master, who would go on to win his first title in the final against Barret Yoshida.

The under 66kg category of the ADCC was owned by the same guy since 1999. Without false modesty, shortly after taking his third, in 2001, Royler Gracie remarked: “Few have had the pleasure of being Jiu-Jitsu world champion four times in a row, as I have, and now three times in Abu Dhabi. This is unprecedented and unlikely to be matched,” said the Gracie after beating Hawaiian Barret Yoshida for his third.

So, when the ADCC disembarked in the Ibirapuera park, in Sao Paulo, on the 17th and 18th of May, 2003, the general expectation was that the three-time champion would at least make it to the semifinal of the under 66kg. From the way the brackets were set up, there Royler would face the rising star of Leo Vieira, then leader of Master, who would go on to win his first title in the final against Barret Yoshida.

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But on the path there was an underdog from California. Who had heard of Eddie Bravo? The American trials winner was losing the match when he managed to replace guard and sink a triangle on the distracted Gracie (photo above): “I don’t know how to explain it. It was really quick, as though I’d disconnected from the match for three seconds. When I came to, I was in a triangle,” Royler tried to explain after having tapped out for the first time in his weight category, with or without the gi. In the follow up, Leo didn’t give Bravo a chance in the semifinal.

Royler still went on to fight again and with an 8 to 0 score over Alexandre “Soca” Carneiro secured third place and his fourth time on the winners’ stand in a row for the Gracie Humaita leader. Eddie Bravo didn’t compete for third, alleging injury, and never again appeared in the ADCC.

The ADCC has seen other underdogs, not quite as unlikely, but underdogs nevertheless.

That very event, in the under 99kg category, Norwegian Jon Olav Einemo is to this day responsible for Roger Gracie’s lone loss in the ADCC (photo below). Then 21 years old, the current two-time absolute world champion was sincere in explaining his defeat: “Truth is, I underestimated the guy. I went in slow, to let him exert force and push the pace, but, when I realized what was going on, he was on my back.

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Going back in time, in 1999, in Abu Dhabi, the underdog had his way in the under 88kg of the second installment of the ADCC. In the division considered the most evenly matched, a pair of Russians managed to made it through to the final in the presence of Renzo Gracie, Ricardo Libório, Fábio Gurgel and Amaury Bitetti. Kareem Barchlov (in the photo below throwing Liborio) and Alexander Savko decided the title, with Kareem, who curiously had Savko in his corner throughout the competition, taking gold.

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In another leap in time, we arrive at 2007, when the ADCC touched down in New Jersey. Last event, it was Saulo Ribeiro who was surprised by an underdog (photo below on the right). Right in his second match in the under 77kg category, the two-time champion (2000 and 2003) was submitted by Mike Fowler, who earlier beat Renzo Gracie (photo below on left), another two-time champion (1998 and 2000). The Lloyd Irvin student, famous for his leopard spotted hair, took fourth after losing to Marcelo Garcia and Andre Galvao, in the third-place decider.

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Rounding out the list of underdogs, we return to 2003. In Ibirapuera Park, only the absolute dispute remains. Signed up are Marcio “Pe de Pano” Cruz, Saulo Ribeiro, Marcelo Garcia (who had just run rampant in the under 77kg) and Jeff Monson, just to name the most famous. A little while on, we are at the final and untrue to expectations, the finalists are Alexandre Cacareco and Dean Lister, with the latter a true underdog. Firstly, Lister wasn’t even going to participate and only entered because Jon Olav dropped out. On his way to the final, the American went past Nathan Marquardt and ran into Saulo Ribeiro (photo below). Lister ended up beating the two-time champion with a kneebar in overtime.

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The opponent in the semifinal was over-99kg champion Pe de Pano, a firm favorite. Lister held out against a choke from his back for five minutes to win in overtime. On Pe de Pano’s choke hold, Dean was nonchalant: “I’ve spent over 100 hours in triangles.” In the final, a quick ankle lock on Cacareco guaranteed him first place..

Can you think of any other ADCC underdogs? If so, please comment.

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Do you know that Minotauro competed at the ADCC? What about Tito Ortiz, Vitor Belfort or Matt Hughes? Do you remember?

Ever since 1998, the ADCC and its big-money prizes have drawn in a slew of different grappling styles styles, nationalities from the world over and athletes representing all the world’s major fighting events.

Some names have become synonymous with the competition, like Renzo (seven appearances), Saulo Ribeiro, Leo Vieira (six) and Ze Mario Sperry.

Many, though, participated in one or two editions and went on to shine in other fields, MMA for instance. We drew from memory a list of these characters who in but one chapter of the extensive soap opera of the ADCC. If you feel some of the champions are missing, don’t worry, they will have a post all to themselves.

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Rodrigo Gracie – He won the under 88kg category in 1998. The next year, a knee injury kept him from defending his title. He returned in 2000 and took fourth in the under 77kg division.

Robin Gracie – The current leader of Gracie Barcelona did just fine in 1998, when he took silver in the under 66kg category. He returned in 1999, in the under 77kg, and fell out in the quarterfinals.

Rodrigo Medeiros – The black belt Carlson Gracie disciple made his appearance in 1998, in the under 77kg category. He lost to Renzo Gracie in the quarterfinals.

Carlos Newton – The Canadian Ronin, who after shining in Pride, competed in 1998, in the under 88kg category. He lost in his second match to eventual champion Rodrigo Gracie.

Oleg Taktarov – A star for the early days of the UFC, the Russian showed up in the ADCC in 1998. He started out well, but dropped out in the under 99kg category semifinal, when he was squashed by American Beau Hershberger. In the absolute, he lost in his first against Ze Mario.

Ahmed Farag – The Egyptian maintains to this day the distinction of being the only Middle Easterner to make it to the winners’ stand in the ADCC. Third place in the under 88kg division in 1998 guaranteed him the honor.

Vinicius “Draculino” Magalhaes – The Brazilian black belt who now teaches in Texas tried his luck in 1999. He fell out in his second match in the under 66kg category, against training partner Alexandre “Soca” Carneiro, who would go on to be runner-up.

Andre Pederneiras – The leader of Nova Uniao competed in the under 77kg category, in 1999. He lost his first match, for taking a throw from Hayato Sakurai, who went on to take bronze.

Fabio Gurgel – The general of Alliance didn’t have much luck in the ADCC. In his first match in the under 88kg category, in 1999, he put Nobuhiro Tsurmaki to sleep, but in his second he lost by a throw to Russian runner-up Alexander Savko.

Luis Orlando – 1998’s under 77kg silver medalist Luiz Orlando returned in 1999, when he fell out in his second match to teammate Ricardo Liborio. He did compete in the absolute, but was overcome in his first match.

Joao Roque – Along with Royler Gracie, he earned the title of best match of ADCC 1999. He lost, but made history.

Murilo Bustamante – The leader of the BTT tried his luck in the ADCC in 1999 and 2000. He had three matches in the under 99kg category. He was eliminated by Saulo Ribeiro in a riveting match. In the absolute, he lost to Ricco Rodriguez in the quarterfinals. One year later, Murilo was overcome by Mike Van Arsdale after 15 minutes of combat.

Carlao Barreto – Yet another Carlson Gracie student to appear in the ADCC, Carlao came up against the boogeyman in Mark Kerr in the over 99kg category in 1999, and dropped out of the running. One year later the one to beat him was Ricco Rodriguez, who in a controversial match overcame the Brazilian.

Wellington Dias – Megaton only had one match in the ADCC. IN 1999, he faced Hawaiian Barret Yoshida right of the bat and tapped to a flying armbar.

Alexandre “Pequeno” Nogueira – The “King of Shooto” appeared in the ADCC in 2000, in the under 66kg category. After winning his first, he lost in the semifinal to Joel Gilbert.

Marcio “Cromado” Barbosa – the leader of RFT team had but one bout at ADCC 2000 and was unlucky to come up against under 77kg runner-up Jean Jacques Machado, who finished him.

Roberto “Roleta” Magalhaes – The inventor of weird-jitsu had two matches in the under 88kg category in 2000. In the second, he faced runner-up Ricardo Liborio and was only defeated in overtime. He returned for the absolute and lost to Comprido in the opening stage.

Jorge “Macaco” Patino – Macaco, who now teaches in New Jersey, reached the semifinal of the under 88kg category, losing dramatically to Ricardo Liborio, after fracturing his arm.

Antonio Schembri – Elvis had two appearances in the ADCC. In 2000, he lost right away to Kareem Berchlov, in a match considered one of the best of the event. Afterwards, in the absolute he also dropped out in his first against Mike Van Arsdale. One year on, Nino made his mark. After submitting Akehiro Gono, he ran rampant over 1999 and 2000’s finalist Alexandre Savko and caught the Belarusian’s arm within seconds, earning the admiration of the gymnasium. In the semifinal, he succumbed to Saulo Ribeiro, but he had already left his mark.

Matt Hughes – The wrestler who would go on to become one of the greatest idols of the UFC appeared in the under 99kg category at ADCC 2000. He overcame Ricardo Cachorrao, but stopped at his compatriot Jeff Monson.

Tito Ortiz – The “Bad Boy from Huntington Beach” put in a great showing in the under 99kg category in 200. He made it to the semifinal losing only to Ricardo Arona, but securing bronze.

Rodrigo Medeiros – Comprido competed at the ADCC 2000 and lost in his second to Jeff Monson, in the over 99kg category. In the absolute, the same deal but eliminated by Tito Ortiz after beating Roleta.

Josh Barnett – The UFC and Pride star showed up at the ADCC in 2000, in the over 99kg category. Unlucky, he came up against his compatriot Mark Kerr right off the bat. In the absolute, another loss in his first match, this time to Ricardo Cachorrao.

Antonio Rodrigo “Minotauro” Nogueira – The most popular athlete in the Brazilian MMA scene went out on a limb at ADCC 2000. Mino was submitted by Ricco Rodriguez by kneebar.

Robson Moura – Robson secured bronze in the under 66kg category at ADCC 2001. He dropped out in the semifinal to three-time champion Royler Gracie, but overcame Alexandre Soca in the bronze-medal dispute.

Fredson Paixao – Another Brazilian to compete in 2001 in the under 66kg category. Paixao, though, was unlucky and fell out in the opening stage against Joey Gilbert.

Matt Serra – The Renzo Gracie student took silver in the under 77kg div in 2001. To make it there he went past Takanori Gomi, Jean Jacques Machado and Leonardo Santos. He was only stopped by Marcio Feitosa.

Takanori Gomi – As aforementioned, the Japanese MMA star had one match at ADCC 2001, losing to Matt Serra.

Vitor Belfort – Vitor ventured into the over 99kg category at ADCC 2001. He had a good debut and a takedown secured a win over Hikori Fakuda. In the next match, though, Belfort was overcome by South African Mark Robinson.

Leonardo Castello Branco – One of the leaders of Brasa, he appeared in the ADCC in 2001. In the heaviest category, Leo lost to Sean Alvarez.

Eddie Bravo – in 2003, Bravo shocked the world of submitting three-time champion Royler Gracie. And stopped there.

Fernando Terere – The star from the Cantagalo favela had two matches in the under 77kg category at ADCC 2003. In his first he defeated Jussi Tammelin, but later lost to Otto Olsen.

Ryan Gracie – the late Ryan, always controversial, had an unforgettable match against under 88kg runner-up Ronaldo Jacare, in 2003.

Matt Lindland – the American was Jacare’s second victim in the under 88kg category of 2003.

Nathan Marquardt – Now at the top of the UFC’s middleweight division after drubbing Demian Maia, he wasn’t quite so successful in 2003 and lost in his first to Comprido in the under 88kg category.

Fernando Pontes – Margarida made it to the second stage of the under 88kg category in 2003, to be eliminated by David Terrel.

Eduardo Telles – The leader of Nine Nine did fine in 2005’s under 99kg division. He submitted Antoine Jaoude with a slick straight kneebar, but left his arm in the hands of Roger Gracie.

Daniel Gracie – Took fourth in the under 99kg category in 2005.

Luiz Theodoro – Big Mac fell out in the opening stage of 2007’s absolute. In the over 99kg category he made it up to the second stage.

Did we forget anyone? Please feel free to comment.

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